Atomic Explosion … in 1812!

We all know from the textbooks on the history of Russia, that in 1812 the French led by Napoleon entered Moscow. The city was given up without a fight – it was a wise strategic plan of the Russian command led by Kutuzov.

And while Napoleon Bonaparte waited for the defeated Russians to bring him the keys to the city and to sit down at the table in order to begin negotiations, a fire broke out, which almost burned down the entire capital of Russia.

After that, the French army was forced to leave Moscow and to run home by the devastated road of Smolensk, suffering enormous losses. And so, the myth of the invincibility of the army of Napoleon was scattered into the wind with the ashes. The collapse of Napoleon’s political career began with that event.

Who set fire to Moscow?

Historians still argue over who set fire to Moscow in September of 1812. However, if we dig deeper, we will discover that neither side was interested in this fire, nor did it happen spontaneously because of natural forces, and eventually it is discovered that it wasn’t a “normal” fire at all.

All of the current versions as to what happened during the Moscow fire of 1812 are based on politics. Because of that, the truth is very difficult to find, but it is clear that neither Napoleon nor the Russians needed this disaster.

Maybe it was an accident after all? Not likely! The surprise is that fires in Moscow have occurred before, and even just as devastating. But to destroy over three quarters of the buildings and to kill tens of thousands of people – it was just impossible! For example, in 1737 a raging fire engulfed the entire center of the capital and was commensurate with the tragedy of 1812. However, in all, only 90 people were killed in the fire of 1737, while the fire in September of 1812 killed approximately thirty thousand Frenchmen, not to even mention tens of thousands of Russians, who were not able to evacuate the capital.

And why do eyewitnesses describe this fire as very strange? Especially strange appear to be the people who were at this time in Moscow, who appeared to be in some kind of shock, when the fire ignited. The French were no longer interested in the Russians, and the last – had no business with yesterday’s enemies and conquerors? And why did people roam the capital of Russia like somnambulists?

Finally, Moscow at the beginning of the nineteenth century was already far from being made of wood. How did an ordinary fire wipe off the face of the Earth three-quarters of the stone buildings all the way to foundation? Even the Kremlin was completely destroyed. It wasn’t not even saved from the fire by neither by the enormous ditches, nor by wide squares that separated the Kremlin walls from the surrounding city buildings. The ditches thirty meters wide and thirteen meters deep were so inundated with the fragments of this “fire”, that they were never restored.

And although the entire fire was then written off on the French, who allegedly blew up Moscow; the French simply had no ammunition, no real opportunity to do so, and especially instantly. By the way, Napoleon, who was at the Kremlin during that time, barely escaped, and only thanks to the underground passage from the Kremlin that led across the Moscow River.

If we compare all of the scattered evidence, testimonies and memories of witnesses, the picture develops that on that fateful September day – an atomic bomb was detonated over Moscow. This is confirmed by the distribution of the background radiation levels in the capital today, it is more eloquent than any words, indicating traces of use of nuclear weapons. By this trail, you can clearly define the epicenter of the explosion and the dispersion of its radioactive products, which is consistent with the descriptions of the “fire” by the eyewitnesses.

Memories of French Eyewitnesses

Now let’s turn to the written sources, that is, look at how “Moscow fire” is described by the French, who were at that time in the Russian capital. Here, for instance, what Lieutenant Charles Artois of the Napoleon’s army wrote in his diaries.

On that day, the dim sun illuminated Moscow with golden light. Suddenly, a second sun appeared just above the true sun, it was so bright, that it blinded my eyes; and it burned the face of Paul Berger, who was relaxing on the balcony. Our house and the roof began to smoke, so we had to douche them with water. In other estates, which were closer to the “mock sun”, fires broke out …

A week later, after the second sun appeared, Paul wrote that all the officers and men began to lose hair, that men and horses were sick and weak, so the command made a decision to leave Moscow and it was received with great relief. Paul even described the retreat as very peculiar. From his record it shows that the French soldiers suffered not only from the Russian frosts and guerrilla raids, but first and foremost from some strange disease that they have picked up in Moscow. People could not eat, became covered with ulcers and sores, which led to hundreds dying every day, and the horses were weak and fell. Paul Artois himself returned to France an invalid, resigned and soon died of the “Russian contagion” at the age of thirty two years. According to the Moscow publication “Russians and Napoleon Bonaparte” (1814), the French lost more than thirty thousand people during their forty-day stay in Moscow, that is, as much as at Borodino. Why did it happen?..

By the way, Napoleon, apparently, being in the stone building at the time of the appearance of the “second sun”, did not receive a strong dose of radiation. However, he died in prison on the island of St. Helena not of a natural death, but apparently from arsenic poisoning. The symptoms of radiation sickness are very similar to such poisoning.

The Comte de Segur in his memoirs also writes that his officers have seen a “second sun”, from which stone buildings ignited like candles, so in a few minutes Moscow was reduced to piles of debris. And among the people were wandering men, women and children; wandering as if blind ghosts; the majority in charred clothes and with blackened faces. Two officers, the count wrote, on that day were in the Kremlin building. They saw an unusual light flash in the sky, which is then covered the buildings, and they began to crumble like a house of cards. The sphere, according to the reports of officers from all sides, ignited over the palace of knyaz Trubetskoy … A nuclear explosion at the beginning of the 19th century?

By the way, all the diaries and memoirs of the French are well known, but historians select from them only that which corresponds to the generally accepted doctrine of the Moscow fire of 1812. For example, the most common version is that Moscow was burned by the order of their own Kutuzov and the executor was Governor-General of Moscow, Count Rostopchin, though he once wrote unequivocally that such blasphemous accusation against him, as against Kutuzov is … “bullshit”.

Everything indicates that at the time, an atomic bomb was detonated over Moscow. The light from it burned all the stone buildings of the capital at that time, and the people in the city received a lethal dose of radiation, that is why the French army suffered such huge losses. But where did the atomic weapon in the early nineteenth century come from?

There are three versions as to what really happened, and one is more unbelievable than the other.

According to the first version, the blow to the French was inflicted by a crypto-civilization, the so called “great ancient ones”, who inhabit the underground Russia. Perhaps it is for this reason Kutuzov had left Moscow, even though the Russian army was almost victorious at Borodino. It turns out that the Russian leadership knew about the impending nuclear strike and allowed Moscow to be destroyed for the sake of the homeland. Indeed, what Napoleon would do, if this fire would not happen, is unknown …

The second version, and I believe this version to be the closest to what actually happened (and many conspiracy theorists may agree with me) is that the atomic explosion which happened over Moscow was just a “trial run”. The real devastation followed in the coming years. It is said that Napoleon’s true aim (at least one of them) was to take colonies (including India) away from the British. In addition, Napoleon was able to anger the Jewish ruling families in 1806 (who’s support … and money he had before) by saying the following:

We must consider the Jews not only as a certain nationality, but as foreigners. It would be a humiliation for the French to be under the authority of the lowest nation on Earth. («La Vieille France», No 305).

Now, those ruling Jewish families (one is said to be the Rothschild) had a different enemy in those days – the Grande Tartarie! The Grande Tartarie was said to be the greatest empire on Earth at that time, with a population of at least 130 million. It is also said that Moscow was never the capital of what Russian territory is today, but rather of only “Moskovia” (the province of Moscow). There is also a theory that Napoleon’s true aim was to create an alliance with the Grande Tartarie in order to take away the colony of India away from the British. Because such a powerful alliance would create real problems for Moskovia and the powerful Jewish family (who’s country of residence was said to be Britain), Moskovia could have created an alliance of its own.

It is currently said that all technologies that are available to the masses (like cell phones, internet, television, etc.) are at least twenty years behind of what is actually available. Now imagine, that the gap is not twenty years, but is instead several hundred years. This would make it possible for the most powerful families to have, or to at least have developed, atomic weapons back in the early 19th century. And so, Moscow was “sacrificed” as a way of stopping Napoleon and testing the power of such weapons, for in the following years, thousands of such atomic bombs with a yield of over 1 megaton and some with yields of over 10 megatons were detonated over the territory of the Grande Tartarie.

There are several factors that confirm such a nuclear way: first, the population of the Grande Tartarie has been reduced from over 130 million to less than 3 million by the census of 1820; second, there are virtually no trees older than 150-200 years in what used to be the territory of the Grande Tartarie; third, there are literally thousands of perfectly round lakes of different size in modern day Russia and Siberia, the names of many of these lakes have a direct relationship to death (or dying); lastly, the “year without summer” of 1816 (or as I like to refer to it – the year of nuclear winter). After looking at satellite images of the territory of once Grande Tartarie, it becomes apparent that not only large cities, but also towns, villages and even small communities were destroyed … none were left alive!

Records of Arabic sources speak of the Grande Tartarie as of a “commonwealth of a thousand cities” … cities that literally disappeared overnight!!!

The third and final version of what could’ve happened to Moscow in September of 1812 is very difficult to believe, but again, no matter how unbelievable, we’re not going to rule it out. There is an opinion that some of the energy from a future nuclear blast “moved in time”, and that Moscow is still waiting for a powerful nuclear attack that will have an “impact” on Napoleon’s army in 1812, thereby disrupting Napoleon’s victory over Russia. However, there are many inconsistencies in such a theory, for example, Kutuzov made a decision to leave Moscow right before the disaster. Did Kutuzov possess a gift of foresight? Although anything is possible, and the atomic bomb could’ve even arrived from a parallel world.

One thing is for certain – Moscow was burned in 1812 not by saboteurs, but by a nuclear strike. It is also clear that the official historical science will never confirm this …

Information taken from internet sources

Translated and written by: Dmitriy Kushnir

Writing is hard work and takes a lot of energy, so if you found this article useful, buy me a coffee or an energy bar.

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